EDITORIAL: Advertising to children is wrong

Staff Editorial

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Advertising and branding are both highly prevalent in the U.S.

Too often, we see individuals buying specific clothing or other items, simply because they are the new trend and they have been advertised all over the media.

In the U.S., it is legal to create advertisements that are geared toward children. Some countries, such as the United Kingdom, Denmark and Belgium for example, have serious restrictions on advertisements to children.

We at The Daily Eastern News find advertising to children to be a bad idea, and we also believe that it could be detrimental.

Children are impressionable and easily convinced, and if they become flooded with advertisements, they are at risk of losing their sense of individuality.

We believe individuality is an important aspect for everyone, as humans are all different and we should be proud of that.

Children whose minds are pummeled by advertisements are easily convinced that they must purchase these branded items because they have the desire to fit in with everyone else.

While it is human nature to want to fit in with a group of people, we firmly believe that children should be taught the importance of individuality, and they should know it is OK to be different than other people.

We also find it very unrealistic for advertisements to be geared toward children.

After all, children are not consumers. They do not have careers or the financial means to purchase such items.

Sure, children do have their interests in material things, such as clothing and toys, but we do not believe that it is necessary for these brands to advertise to them.

Also, some of the items that are branded and advertised to children are not healthy.

According to HealthyFoodAmerica.org, “food and beverage companies spend $1.8 billion each year marketing food brands and products to children as young as two years old.”

Unfortunately, these food products are not the healthy ones that children should be eating.

According to a 2013 study by the organization, 84 percent of the ads viewed by children promote foods that are high in saturated fat, trans fats, sugars or sodium.

Do we really want our children to face the possibility of obesity and other health problems before they even hit their teenage years?

We feel that it is highly ridiculous that companies are putting forth the amount of time and money that they do in order to get children lured into purchasing branded products when they are potentially unhealthy.

We feel that it would be more realistic for these advertisements to be geared toward parents, and they can decide for themselves whether or not they want their children to have these products.

Children are too young to know what is real and what is not real, and we should not take advantage of this just to sell a piece of clothing or a food product.

We urge companies to really consider what is important, whether it is making the big bucks that they do to sell these items or whether it is the health of children and their sense of individuality.

It is OK to want to feel a part of a group, but we must remember that we are all different as human beings, and we should be OK with it.

Let the children in this country decide who they are and what they want for themselves. They shouldn’t be manipulated by ads.

The Editorial Staff can be reached at 581-2812 or at [email protected].