Editorial: Straight Pride hype does not make sense

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Up until 2015 marriage between same-sex couples was illegal. 

Private homosexual activity was illegal nationwide until 2003 via Lawrence v. Texas. 

Over the years LGBTQIA+ individuals have been discriminated against time and time again and have fought through it. 

They have had laws restricting their lives and, even to this day, can still face a lot of judgment.

For all those reasons and many more, they are marginalized. 

That is why it makes sense for them to have an event to bring pride to the members of their community and uplift one another.

What does not make sense, though, is that a straight pride parade occurred this past Saturday in Boston. 

Yes, a pride parade for people who wanted to celebrate their heterosexuality, even though they have never been targeted for their sexual preferences. 

Heterosexual couples do not face the same mass discrimination as queer couples. 

They have not been oppressed by state or national laws and there is absolutely no threat of that happening to them in the near future. 

It has always been acceptable for heterosexual couples to be publicly affectionate toward each other, love each other and get married, but unfortunately, the same cannot be said for homosexual couples who just wanted to do the same things. 

Pride events, whether they are based on sexuality, race or gender, are meant to uplift and empower the people who have not always been treated fairly, both as individuals and as a community. 

The straight pride parade was therefore unnecessary, especially when straight people have not been discriminated against in the past and are not currently being discriminated against.

This parade was not only unnecessary, but incredibly apathetic and disrespectful to LGBTQIA+ members and the equality efforts made by their groups and advocates. 

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs recorded statistics from May 15 to July 15 this year, which included the entire month of June, also recognized as Pride Month, regarding anti-LGBTQIA+ hate and violence.

During this time, there were 22 anti-LGBTQIA+ protests and 14 LGBTQIA+ homicides.

Events like the Straight Pride Parade that seemingly mock the struggles of those who have been targeted in the past are not necessarily something to be proud of.