Support, don’t shame college students

Carole Hodorowicz, Columnist

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






If there is anything in the whirlwind of college that disappoints me most, it is major-shaming.

Too often I witness or overhear college students judge their fellow college students for what area of study they have chosen to pursue.

Major-shaming comes in a variety of forms—some are more obvious than others. One of the most common and subtle forms begins with, “Is that REALLY all you have to do for homework? I have to [insert assignment that the major-shamer believes sounds more impressive and complicated],” or “I feel like you have so much free time. I am always [insert activity that the major-shamer constantly uses to hoist himself or herself onto a high horse].” Sometimes, it can be as blatant as, “So-And-So’s major is so easy. I don’t know why So-And-So is always complaining while I have to [insert major-shamer’s spiel].”

Whatever form it presents itself in, major-shaming is the last thing any college student should be participating in. Although we do not have all the same classes, aspirations and stressors, we are all in the same boat here—and chances are, most of us have no clue what direction it is sailing.

Spoiler alert: Most people enter a field that interests them or pick a major that reflects their skillset best. That is something that should be encouraged, especially amongst people our age, not something we use to judge and insult each other.

These days, all of us are under so much pressure from our parents and peers. Finding a job, especially one that fits the criteria of your wildest fantasies and pays well, is not easy. Competition is fierce, and the weight of expectations is crippling.

Instead of watching each other struggle—or worse, participate in heightening the tension by joining in on major-shaming activity—we should be building each other up.

There should be no divide between all of us. Each major presents its own difficulties that not everyone is equipped to handle. Our differences should be celebrated—not mocked or shamed.

Each academic journey we are embarking on leads to a different ending of opportunities that fit our personalities, talents and passions best. Instead of being another bump in the road for someone, be a motivator. Or better yet, just stay silent and focus on yourself.

Carole Hodorowicz is a senior journalism major. She can be reached at 581-2812 or [email protected].