Third annual Musefest benefits CTF Illinois, brings face painting, food trucks

Katie+Jenkins%2C+a+senior+biology+major+paints+Katie+Saterfield%E2%80%99s+face+during+Musefest+at+the+Charleston+High+School+art+club+booth.
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Third annual Musefest benefits CTF Illinois, brings face painting, food trucks

Katie Jenkins, a senior biology major paints Katie Saterfield’s face during Musefest at the Charleston High School art club booth.

Katie Jenkins, a senior biology major paints Katie Saterfield’s face during Musefest at the Charleston High School art club booth.

Olivia Swenson-Hultz

Katie Jenkins, a senior biology major paints Katie Saterfield’s face during Musefest at the Charleston High School art club booth.

Olivia Swenson-Hultz

Olivia Swenson-Hultz

Katie Jenkins, a senior biology major paints Katie Saterfield’s face during Musefest at the Charleston High School art club booth.

Chaela Krueger, Entertainment Editor

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Featuring everything from dog treats to jewelry to artwork, local arts and crafts vendors came together Saturday to display their talents and businesses to the Charleston community at third annual Musefest.

Musefest was aimed to benefit the Charleston Transitional Facility in Illinois, an organization that provides programs and services to those with disabilities.

“The event brings local artists and local crafters together for a community event to show their work,” said Musefest Coordinator Joshua Benton.

It also included face painting, food and beverages, and live music from musical groups from around the area.

This was the first year that there were food trucks and Benton said he hopes next year they will incorporate a beer garden.

He said they would like to add a new feature to the festival every year.

Musefest started out with 12 vendors in its first year and has grown to include about 25 vendors this year.

Vendors like Kelsie Sprague travel to events like Musefest to sell their products and help the community.

Sprague works for Agnes & Dora, a clothing shop she described as being similar to clothing manufacturer LuLa Roe. All the articles of clothing Sprague sells are made in the United States, except for leggings.

She does not have a storefront, so much of her advertising comes from her social media accounts and events like Musefest.

Benton said he hopes the festival will keep expanding every year.

Benton is also an art director at 9 Muses Art Gallery, a nonprofit organization that has teamed up with CTF Illinois.

At 9 Muses Art Gallery, individuals with disabilities are guided to become more individualistic and successful by creating artwork.

Their work was displayed at the 9 Muses Art Gallery tent at the event.

For more information, Benton can be reached by telephone at 217-348-8798.

Want more photos? Click here to check out our gallery>>>https://www.dailyeasternnews.com/2017/06/05/gallery-musefest-2017/

Chaela Krueger can be reached at 581-2812 or [email protected].