Students discuss the concept of ‘Netflix and chill’

Chris Picazo, Opinions Editor

Lanise Florence, a junior family consumer science major, responds to a question posed by a member of Omega Psi Phi at the “Netflix and Chill” forum on Wednesday in the physical science building.

Molly Dotson
Lanise Florence, a junior family consumer science major, responds to a question posed by a member of Omega Psi Phi at the “Netflix and Chill” forum on Wednesday in the physical science building.

The men of Omega Psi Phi fraternity led a discussion Wednesday about what “Netflix and Chill” means in this day and age.

The forum was meant to get the female perspective about what the term means and how it came to be a thing among this generation of college students.

Julian Robertson, vice president of Omega Psi Phi, said the reason to gain a female perspective was because the term is usually aimed at females.

“A lot of guys ask it towards girl instead of the reserve,” Robertson said. “So we wanted to find out what women think about this whole Netflix and Chill concept, as towards, ‘let’s go on a date or let’s go to a movie,’ over the standardized situation.”

The forum was also meant to gain perspective from students if traditional dating still occurs or to see if it has disappeared in the era of “Netflix and Chill.”

Omega Psi Phi began the discussion by asking the audience if “Netflix and Chill” has changed the way college students see dating and how students feel about it.

Desiree Edwards, a junior family and consumer science, said Netflix and Chill is a hidden agenda for some males.

“Nine times out of 10, the attention for Netflix and Chilling is to not watch Netflix or to chill,” Edwards said. “They don’t have chill when it comes to Netflix and Chill.”

Edwards also said the term is just another way of saying “hooking up.”

“Guys are more comfortable asking girls to Netflix and Chill than to ask her out on a real date,” Edwards said.

Robertson said the concept of the term is a generational thing, and said past generations had similar things, but Netflix and Chill is occurring because of the advances in technology.

“The technology is a crutch for people to almost to be lazy in a way,” Robertson said. “It’s just a new way of saying hooking up.”

Junior kinesiology major Isis Sims said the concept of “Netflix and Chill” has “taken over” of what a relationship is and it can have different meanings in different situations.

“It is starting to take the form in certain situations,” said Sims. “It depends on the person you are interacting with. If you have been talking to this person for a while then it can very much so be a date, but if it’s that the first event between two (people) then it could show some hidden agendas.”

Sims said the “Netflix and Chill” has developed a negative connotation with the change in the current generation of students.

“We don’t focus on commitment or we don’t take the time to try and be with other people anymore,” Sims said. “A lot of people go for what is easy nowadays, and it has taken over.”

Sims said the term is different for individuals and students are adults, so they are aware of what they are doing.

“If you feel like you are not comfortable with Netflix and Chill with someone then it’s going to lead to something you don’t want to happen then definitely avoid it,” Sims said. “If you can be mature about the situation then go for it.”

Robertson said the forum had a good turnout and was satisfied with responses for both women and men.

“It’s a phenomenon, so it’s good what the women think about Netflix and Chill and their ideas on the whole thing.”

 

Chris Picazo can be reached 581-2812 or at [email protected]